They Must Be Destroyed On Sight!

———————————————————————————————————————-

TMBDOS! Episode 227: “Knives Out!” (2019).

March 1st, 2021

CRWOIGE44YI6TBTCTP6SHM4H5A.jpg

In honor of the late, great Christopher Plummer, Lee, Daniel, Leah and special guest host Sam try and navigate the twists and turns of Rian Johnson's ensemble murder mystery "Knives Out!" (2019), featuring Plummer in one of his last roles. Who is the real stand-out star of this great cast of big names? What's a Timbit and how does that figure in to this film? The hosts also talk about they've watched recently and respond to a rather lengthy and critical bit of listener feedback.

"Knives Out!" IMDB 

If you like beer reviews, and want to see a beer review channel Lee and Leah often appear on, check out our friend Nick's channel here

Featured Music: "Knives Out! (String Quartet in G Minor)" by Nathan Johnson & "Righteous Rocker #1" by Larry Norman.

TMBDOS! Episode 226: “Dance Charlie Dance” (1937) & “The Law in Her Hands” (1936).

February 15th, 2021

LAWCARTERDANCE.jpg

Lee, Daniel and Leah are back this week checking out two films featuring the talents of the lovely Glenda Farrell. First it's an example of the classic small-town boy gets taken for a sucker tale, "Dance Charlie Dance" (1937) and then they move over to a film about smart, independent female lawyers trying to make their way in a male-dominated profession, "The Law in Her Hands" (1936). Which film did a heel turn on the hosts and made them hate it? Tune in to find out. Leah and Lee also talk about what they've watched as of late.

"Dance Charlie Dance" IMDB 

"The Law in her Hands" IMDB 

If you like beer reviews, check out friend of the show, Tomas' YouTube Channel here

Featured Music: "La-La-La Lies" by The Who; "Let Her Dance" by Bobby Fuller and The Bobby Fuller Four; and "Lawyers in Love" by Jackson Browne.

TMBDOS! Episode 223: “Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!” (1965).

December 21st, 2020

Fasterpussff.png

Lee, Daniel, and special guest Leah go-go dance, drive fast cars, wear revealing clothes, and kill all-American men as they talk about the Russ Meyer classic exploitation film "Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!" (1965). Topics include the depiction of women in this era; go-go dancing; fetishes on screen; tease vs sleaze; Russ Meyer the accidental feminist, and so much more. Also, Leah gets to play the Movie God Game, and the hosts respond to listener comments. Don't try listening to this one, just do it!

See Leah in the short film "Ghost Beaver Kick" and her work on stage in "The Zoo Story".  

"Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!" IMDB 

Featured Music: "Boy, What'll You Do Then" by Denise & Company, and "Faster, Pussycat!" by The Bostweeds.

TMBDOS! Episode 220: “Mad Love” (1935).

November 2nd, 2020

unnamed.jpg

This week Lee and Daniel check out Peter Lorre's intro into Hollywood with Karl Freund's "Mad Love" (1935). Topics brought up include some notable cast members other than Lorre; the differences between doctors and surgeons; transplantation of limbs, and where the science was in 1935 as compared to more recent years; and pondering why this is a bit of a lost film. Also brought up: listener comments and what Daniel has watched as of late.

"Mad Love" IMDB 

Daniel's recent podcast appearances:

Embrace the Void 
The Jacked-Up Review Show 

Featured Music: "Head Cut Off" by Beck & "She Drives Me Crazy" by Fine Young Cannibals.

TMBDOS! Episode 219: “The 39 Steps” (1935).

October 19th, 2020

image-asset.jpeg

Lee and Daniel return to cover one of the films that put Alfred Hitchcock on the map, that being "The 39 Steps" (1935). Some of the conversation revolves around early examples of Hitchcock's visual style and techniques, and tropes. Other things covered: Hitchcock abusing his actors (especially the women); differences between the film and its source material; Hitchcock getting away with sexy situations in the post-code era; and how the hosts could turn this into a Bikini Carwash film (because of course we do). A listener comment is also responded to.

"The 39 Steps" IMDB 

Featured Music: "Secret Agent Man" by The Ventures & "Before they Make Me Run" by The Rolling Stones.

TMBDOS! Episode 217: “The Thin Man” (1934).

September 28th, 2020

thin_man-1200-1200-675-675-crop-0000008ymkn.jpg

Lee & Daniel are back this week to solve some cases while hammered. This time out it's the comedy detective film "The Thin Man" (1934), directed by W.S. Van Dyke, based on a book by Dashiell Hammett. Much is made of the greatness of William Powell & Myrna Loy's on-screen chemistry, and just how well this film still plays in 2020. Things talked about: drinking all the time; what this series feels like it has influenced; what a new Thin Man series could be like, including casting thoughts; and how this film balances its comedy with the more serious elements. Listener comments are also covered.

"The Thin Man" IMDB

Featured Music: "Jockey Full of Bourbon" by Tom Waits & "One Mint Julep" by Louis Prima.

TMBDOS! Episode 215: “Baby Face” (1933).

September 7th, 2020

babyface.jpg

This week Lee and Daniel are still in 1933, and they decided to sleep their way to the top with bad girl Barbara Stanwyck, in the Alfred E. Green-directed "Baby Face" (1933). Does this pre-code bad-girl-having-sex-picture actually push any boundaries even for its time? Is that John Wayne in a bit part? How is this film comparable with sex comedies and softcore films from the last thirty years? How would the hosts have made this film? Lee also talks briefly about what he's watched as of late.

"Baby Face" IMDB

Featured Music: "Baby Face" by Little Richard & "Femme Fatale" by The Velvet Underground and Nico.

TMBDOS! Episode 214: “The Testament of Dr. Mabuse” (1933).

August 31st, 2020

mabuse.jpg

This week Lee is joined by two of the hosts of the fantastic Grindbin Podcast, Mike Wood & Bobby Trippett, to talk about what many consider to be Fritz Lang's last masterpiece, "The Testament of Dr. Mabuse" (1933). The hosts dive into the thinly veiled central themes of the film, where Lang throws a harsh critical eye on the corruption of the police and government in his day, and how that can (and did) lead to the rise of fascism, not only back then, but in the present day. Also talked about: the touches of German expressionism in the film; Lang's use of sound and visuals to bridge between scenes and distort what the viewer is experiencing; if "proto-noir" is really a useful term at this point in film history; if Fritz Lang did AIP Beach party films; and so much more. Also, a listener comment is responded to; Lee and Mike talk about what they've watched as of late; and Mike & Bobby get to play a round of The Movie God Game.

"The Testament of Dr. Mabuse" IMDB 

Check out The Grindbin Podcast here 

Featured Music: "I'm Your Puppet" by James & Bobby Purify & "Total Control" by The Motels.

TMBDOS! Episode 212: “I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang” (1932).

August 17th, 2020

30_je_suis_evade_2.jpg

Lee and Daniel are still locked up in 1932, but after watching "I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang", they are planning their daring escape to 1933. Much of the conversation revolves around the true events that led to the book that this film is based upon, and how a post WW1 America has helped shape the oppressive and inhumane conditions in Southern chain gangs and prison in general. Further conversation touches on pre-code fun; proto-noir; and Lee talks about what he's watched as of late. Come break some rocks in the hot sun with the hosts.

"I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang" IMDB 

Featured Music: "Chain Gang" by Sam Cooke & "Work Song" by Nina Simone.

TMBDOS! Episode 209: “The Black Camel” & “The Front Page” (1931).

July 13th, 2020

The-Front-Page-11.jpg

Lee and Daniel have made their way back to the 1930s this week. This time out they look at two films from 1931; one of which holds up really well and another that doesn't at all. Between the witty and energetic script and camera moves of "The Front Page" and the slow, plodding mystery of "The Black Camel", they'll let you guess which is which. Things talked about: RIP Ennio Morricone; how Charlie Chan was considered progressive on Asian stereotypes in its day; yellow face; the real man behind Charlie Chan; a bit of the history of Hawaii; Lucy Liu; fancy camera moves in 1931; a mother-fucker with a banjo; taking shits and having drinks in a movie; listener comments and what the hosts have watched as of late.

"The Black Camel" IMDB 

"The Front Page" IMDB 

Featured Music: "Uheuhene" by Sol Hoopii; "Na Lei O Hawaii" by Alfred Apaka; and "By the Light of the Silvery Moon" by Joan Edwards.

TMBDOS! Episode 208: “Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai” (1999).

July 6th, 2020

vlcsnap-2012-01-22-18h12m51s255.png

Lee and Daniel are back this week to walk the path to enlightenment and talk about Jim Jarmusch's "Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai" (1999). Much talk of bullshit codes of honour is had. Also covered: communication without having a common language; sad gangsters watching cartoons; Lee's theory about a slightly hidden subplot in the film; and why are so many homeless people living on the top of buildings in this film? Listener comments are also read. Now, sit back, un-screw that drain-pipe, and take aim.

"Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai" IMDB

Featured Music: "Samurai Theme" by The RZA & "Armagideon Time" by Willie Williams.

TMBDOS! Episode 207: “Lone Star” (1996).

June 29th, 2020

lone-star-1996-1200-1200-675-675-crop-000000.jpg

Lee and Daniel continue to insist that their picks for 1990s movies were not intentionally made in relation to current events. That being said, this week it's John Sayles "Lone Star" (1996), which is a tale of race relations, bad cops, and hidden secrets in a small border town between Mexico and the USA. Fathers and sons; racism even within cultures; police corruption; and the bullshit of the Cold Winter Theory are just a few of the thing talked about, along with the brilliant performances and Sayles flashback techniques. Listener comments are also covered.

"Lone Star" IMDB 

Featured Music: "Down on the Rio Grande" by Johnny Rodríguez & "Blue and Lonesome" by Little Walter.

TMBDOS! Episode 206: “Strange Days” (1995).

June 22nd, 2020

StrangeDays_1995_8-1507673877-726x388.jpg

Lee (who is half in the bag as this starts) and Daniel are back to look at a 1990s favourite of theirs, that being Kathryn Bigelow's "Strange Days" (1995). The hosts talk a lot about how well the sci-fi and noir elements are melded here, and the various plot threads, and if this film holds up over-all, or if it's firmly dated at this point. Other topics include Juliette Lewis being sexy; how the film does or does not confront police corruption and racism head-on; the way rape is presented in the context of the film; and other actors who were considered for the lead role. The hosts also mention what they've watched recently and respond to listener comments.

"Strange Days" IMDB 

Featured Music: "Hardly Wait" by Juliette Lewis & "No White Clouds" by Strange Fruit.

TMBDOS! Episode 205: “Q & A” (1990).

June 8th, 2020

qa-1990-001-timothy-hutton-nick-nolte-police-vans.jpg

This week Lee and Daniel look at Sidney Lumet's "Q & A" (1990). Does this lengthy film manage to properly explore the issues of systematic racism and corruption within police forces, or does it badly drop the ball? Does Nick Nolte's fantastic performance elevate or overshadow the material. And yes, a bit of discussion about the current 2020 riots and clashes with police is had. It was kind of unavoidable. Also: listener comments and what Daniel has been watching lately.

"Q & A" IMDB 

Featured Music: "Tiptoe Through the Tulips" by Tiny Tim & "The Hit" by Ruben Blades.

TMBDOS! Episode 187: “The Blue Carbuncle” (1984).

December 23rd, 2019

MV5BYWJlY.jpg

It's the 2019 Christmas episode! Daniel and Lee are half in the bag, their guest Jack Graham is living on Airstrip One, and they are returning to the Jeremy Brett Sherlock Holmes to talk about the Holmes Christmas episode, the adaptation of "The Blue Carbuncle" from 1984. Very little editing in this one, folks. Lots of asides; bad jokes; what the hosts have watched; and listener comments are all in this jam-packed hour or so of nonsense.

"The Blue Carbuncle" IMDB 

Lee's latest appearance on Cinema Beef

Featured Music: "Sussex Carol" by R.B. Craswell & "I'm the One Who Gunned Santa Down" by Deadbolt

TMBDOS! Episode 185: “The Black Cat” (1934) & “Dementia” (1955).

December 9th, 2019

daughter-of-horror-cigar.jpg

Lee and Daniel are back with two listener suggestions. First up they try and uncover some of the hidden meanings in the first team-up of Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi, in "The Black Cat" (1934). After that they get even more deep into weirdness with "Dementia" (1955). Post-WWI horrors; preservation of women in jizz; the insanity of a woman daring to get revenge for the abuse of her sex in 1950s cinema; and Ed McMahon? All of this and more, as well as a large chunk of listener comments and more of that Baby Yoda show talk.

"The Black Cat" IMDB

"Dementia" IMDB

Featured Music: "Lucifer Sam" by Pink Floyd; Music from "Dementia" by George Antheil; and "At My Front Door (Crazy Little Mama)" by The Eldorados.

TMBDOS! Episode 183: “This Gun for Hire” (1942) & “Woman They Almost Lynched” (1953).

November 11th, 2019

5E8E055A-FCC4-48BE-B224-78207DC1EE8A.jpeg

Lee and Daniel are back to talk about two films suggested by listener Jeff Williams, featuring sexy and dangerous females. First up it is the classic film noir "This Gun for Hire" (1942), and then they move on to talk about an interesting B-western, "Woman They Almost Lynched" (1953). Thinly veiled fetish material; proto-feminism; cat fights; Confederate soldiers portrayed as heroes in westerns of this era; and the recasting of a modern remake of "Woman..." are just a few of the things brought up, as well as listener comments.

Check out Lee's appearance on the latest episode of Movie Melt.

"This Gun for Hire" IMDB

"Woman They Almost Lynched" IMDB

Featured Music: "I've Got You" by Veronica Lake; "How Strange" by Peggy Lee; and "Union Dixie" by Tennessee Ernie Ford.

TMBDOS! Episode 182: “Sherlock Holmes” (2009) & “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” (2011).

November 4th, 2019

iw1280.jpg

Lee, Daniel and returning guest host Jack finally finish off their look into Sherlock Holmes adaptations by looking at the Guy Ritchie-directed and Robert Downey Jr. & Jude Law-starring "Sherlock Holmes" (2009) & "Sherlock Holmes: a Game of Shadows" (2011). This much more informal than usual chat goes in and out of talking about both films at the same time. Some of the topics covered include casting choices; the films going in hard on the ambiguously gay themes; Guy Ritchie's slow-mo and gimmicky look into Holmes' brain; Christopher Lee's hairpiece (yet again); and a joke Daniel and Jack share that almost breaks Daniel and just leave Lee confused. Also: a listener comment and a bit of a talk about "Mindhunter" on Netflix.

Read Jack's short story "Calder's Room" 

"Sherlock Holmes" IMDB 

"Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows" IMDB

Featured Music: "Romanian Wind"; "The Mycroft Suite"; and "Discombobulate" by Hans Zimmer.

TMBDOS! Episode 181: “The Woman in Green” (1945) & “Without a Clue” (1988).

October 21st, 2019

930_sherlock_holmes_blu-ray_2wig.jpg

Lee, Daniel and returning guest host Jack are back for their second-to-last entry in this extended look at Sherlock Holmes adaptations. First up they return to Rathbone with "The Woman in Green" (1945), and then they pretend they know what they are talking about in regards to "Without a Clue" (1988). Noir; hypnotism; serial killings; getting me-too'ed by Watson AND Holmes; shitty Sherlock tv; and some recasting ideas for both films are topics that are touched upon, as well as listener comments.

"The Woman in Green" IMDB

"Without a Clue" IMDB

Featured Music: "Mrs. Giles in Danger"; "Attempting Murder"; and "Main Title" by Henry Mancini.

TMBDOS! Episode 180: “The Norwood Builder” (1985); “The Musgrave Ritual” (1986); “The Devil’s Foot” (1988) .

October 14th, 2019

38e0fa5b02e9bf2405de22761d35a489.png

This week Lee, Daniel and the returning guest host Jack Graham are breaking the general TMBDOS! rule of at least covering one movie on an episode, and are continuing their look at Sherlock Holmes adaptations by talking about three of the Jeremy Brett tv episodes. This time out they talk about "The Norwood Builder" (1985), "The Musgrave Ritual"(1986), and "The Devil's Foot" (1988). Robert Forster; "WKRP in Cincinnati"; "Star Trek" jokes; sexual awakenings; trigonometry; M.R. James & Poe references; and Holmes tripping balls are just some of the things brought up, as well as listener comments and what the hosts have watched as of late.

I Don't Speak German's Twitter

Jack Graham's Twitter

Watch the BBC adaptation of M.R. James' "A Warning to the Curious" 

"The Norwood Builder" IMDB

"The Musgrave Ritual" IMDB

"The Devil's Foot" IMDB

Featured Music: "221B baker Street"; "John Hector McFarlane and His Mother"; and "On the Trail" by Patrick Gowers.

Play this podcast on Podbean App