They Must Be Destroyed On Sight!

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TMBDOS! Episode 208: “Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai” (1999).

July 6th, 2020

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Lee and Daniel are back this week to walk the path to enlightenment and talk about Jim Jarmusch's "Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai" (1999). Much talk of bullshit codes of honour is had. Also covered: communication without having a common language; sad gangsters watching cartoons; Lee's theory about a slightly hidden subplot in the film; and why are so many homeless people living on the top of buildings in this film? Listener comments are also read. Now, sit back, un-screw that drain-pipe, and take aim.

"Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai" IMDB

Featured Music: "Samurai Theme" by The RZA & "Armagideon Time" by Willie Williams.

TMBDOS! Episode 207: “Lone Star” (1996).

June 29th, 2020

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Lee and Daniel continue to insist that their picks for 1990s movies were not intentionally made in relation to current events. That being said, this week it's John Sayles "Lone Star" (1996), which is a tale of race relations, bad cops, and hidden secrets in a small border town between Mexico and the USA. Fathers and sons; racism even within cultures; police corruption; and the bullshit of the Cold Winter Theory are just a few of the thing talked about, along with the brilliant performances and Sayles flashback techniques. Listener comments are also covered.

"Lone Star" IMDB 

Featured Music: "Down on the Rio Grande" by Johnny Rodríguez & "Blue and Lonesome" by Little Walter.

TMBDOS! Episode 206: “Strange Days” (1995).

June 22nd, 2020

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Lee (who is half in the bag as this starts) and Daniel are back to look at a 1990s favourite of theirs, that being Kathryn Bigelow's "Strange Days" (1995). The hosts talk a lot about how well the sci-fi and noir elements are melded here, and the various plot threads, and if this film holds up over-all, or if it's firmly dated at this point. Other topics include Juliette Lewis being sexy; how the film does or does not confront police corruption and racism head-on; the way rape is presented in the context of the film; and other actors who were considered for the lead role. The hosts also mention what they've watched recently and respond to listener comments.

"Strange Days" IMDB 

Featured Music: "Hardly Wait" by Juliette Lewis & "No White Clouds" by Strange Fruit.

TMBDOS! Episode 205: “Q & A” (1990).

June 8th, 2020

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This week Lee and Daniel look at Sidney Lumet's "Q & A" (1990). Does this lengthy film manage to properly explore the issues of systematic racism and corruption within police forces, or does it badly drop the ball? Does Nick Nolte's fantastic performance elevate or overshadow the material. And yes, a bit of discussion about the current 2020 riots and clashes with police is had. It was kind of unavoidable. Also: listener comments and what Daniel has been watching lately.

"Q & A" IMDB 

Featured Music: "Tiptoe Through the Tulips" by Tiny Tim & "The Hit" by Ruben Blades.

TMBDOS! Episode 187: “The Blue Carbuncle” (1984).

December 23rd, 2019

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It's the 2019 Christmas episode! Daniel and Lee are half in the bag, their guest Jack Graham is living on Airstrip One, and they are returning to the Jeremy Brett Sherlock Holmes to talk about the Holmes Christmas episode, the adaptation of "The Blue Carbuncle" from 1984. Very little editing in this one, folks. Lots of asides; bad jokes; what the hosts have watched; and listener comments are all in this jam-packed hour or so of nonsense.

"The Blue Carbuncle" IMDB 

Lee's latest appearance on Cinema Beef

Featured Music: "Sussex Carol" by R.B. Craswell & "I'm the One Who Gunned Santa Down" by Deadbolt

TMBDOS! Episode 185: “The Black Cat” (1934) & “Dementia” (1955).

December 9th, 2019

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Lee and Daniel are back with two listener suggestions. First up they try and uncover some of the hidden meanings in the first team-up of Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi, in "The Black Cat" (1934). After that they get even more deep into weirdness with "Dementia" (1955). Post-WWI horrors; preservation of women in jizz; the insanity of a woman daring to get revenge for the abuse of her sex in 1950s cinema; and Ed McMahon? All of this and more, as well as a large chunk of listener comments and more of that Baby Yoda show talk.

"The Black Cat" IMDB

"Dementia" IMDB

Featured Music: "Lucifer Sam" by Pink Floyd; Music from "Dementia" by George Antheil; and "At My Front Door (Crazy Little Mama)" by The Eldorados.

TMBDOS! Episode 183: “This Gun for Hire” (1942) & “Woman They Almost Lynched” (1953).

November 11th, 2019

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Lee and Daniel are back to talk about two films suggested by listener Jeff Williams, featuring sexy and dangerous females. First up it is the classic film noir "This Gun for Hire" (1942), and then they move on to talk about an interesting B-western, "Woman They Almost Lynched" (1953). Thinly veiled fetish material; proto-feminism; cat fights; Confederate soldiers portrayed as heroes in westerns of this era; and the recasting of a modern remake of "Woman..." are just a few of the things brought up, as well as listener comments.

Check out Lee's appearance on the latest episode of Movie Melt.

"This Gun for Hire" IMDB

"Woman They Almost Lynched" IMDB

Featured Music: "I've Got You" by Veronica Lake; "How Strange" by Peggy Lee; and "Union Dixie" by Tennessee Ernie Ford.

TMBDOS! Episode 182: “Sherlock Holmes” (2009) & “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” (2011).

November 4th, 2019

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Lee, Daniel and returning guest host Jack finally finish off their look into Sherlock Holmes adaptations by looking at the Guy Ritchie-directed and Robert Downey Jr. & Jude Law-starring "Sherlock Holmes" (2009) & "Sherlock Holmes: a Game of Shadows" (2011). This much more informal than usual chat goes in and out of talking about both films at the same time. Some of the topics covered include casting choices; the films going in hard on the ambiguously gay themes; Guy Ritchie's slow-mo and gimmicky look into Holmes' brain; Christopher Lee's hairpiece (yet again); and a joke Daniel and Jack share that almost breaks Daniel and just leave Lee confused. Also: a listener comment and a bit of a talk about "Mindhunter" on Netflix.

Read Jack's short story "Calder's Room" 

"Sherlock Holmes" IMDB 

"Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows" IMDB

Featured Music: "Romanian Wind"; "The Mycroft Suite"; and "Discombobulate" by Hans Zimmer.

TMBDOS! Episode 181: “The Woman in Green” (1945) & “Without a Clue” (1988).

October 21st, 2019

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Lee, Daniel and returning guest host Jack are back for their second-to-last entry in this extended look at Sherlock Holmes adaptations. First up they return to Rathbone with "The Woman in Green" (1945), and then they pretend they know what they are talking about in regards to "Without a Clue" (1988). Noir; hypnotism; serial killings; getting me-too'ed by Watson AND Holmes; shitty Sherlock tv; and some recasting ideas for both films are topics that are touched upon, as well as listener comments.

"The Woman in Green" IMDB

"Without a Clue" IMDB

Featured Music: "Mrs. Giles in Danger"; "Attempting Murder"; and "Main Title" by Henry Mancini.

TMBDOS! Episode 180: “The Norwood Builder” (1985); “The Musgrave Ritual” (1986); “The Devil’s Foot” (1988) .

October 14th, 2019

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This week Lee, Daniel and the returning guest host Jack Graham are breaking the general TMBDOS! rule of at least covering one movie on an episode, and are continuing their look at Sherlock Holmes adaptations by talking about three of the Jeremy Brett tv episodes. This time out they talk about "The Norwood Builder" (1985), "The Musgrave Ritual"(1986), and "The Devil's Foot" (1988). Robert Forster; "WKRP in Cincinnati"; "Star Trek" jokes; sexual awakenings; trigonometry; M.R. James & Poe references; and Holmes tripping balls are just some of the things brought up, as well as listener comments and what the hosts have watched as of late.

I Don't Speak German's Twitter

Jack Graham's Twitter

Watch the BBC adaptation of M.R. James' "A Warning to the Curious" 

"The Norwood Builder" IMDB

"The Musgrave Ritual" IMDB

"The Devil's Foot" IMDB

Featured Music: "221B baker Street"; "John Hector McFarlane and His Mother"; and "On the Trail" by Patrick Gowers.

TMBDOS! Episode 179: “The Hound of the Baskervilles” (1959); “The Final Problem” (1985) & “The Empty House” (1986).

October 7th, 2019

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Lee and Daniel are back once again with their friend Jack Graham to ponder more Sherlock Holmes adaptations on the big and small screen. First up it's the Hammer Horror adaptation of "The Hound of the Baskervilles" (1959), directed by Terence Fisher, and starring Peter Cushing, André Morell & Christopher Lee. Then it's two more episodes of the Jeremy Brett Holmes series, where we cover the apparent death and return of Holmes with "The Final Problem" (1985) & "The Empty House" (1986). Was Hammer suited to adapt Holmes? Why is Moriarty bullshit? Can Watson write a fight scene worth a shit? Dog's bollocks? All this and more is covered in the episode. The hosts also talk about what they've watched recently and listener comments are read.

Lee's apprearance on the Grindbin Podcast talking about "The Yesterday Machine"

"The Hound of the Baskervilles" IMDB

"The Final Problem" IMDB

"The Empty House" IMDB 

Featured Music: "Main Titles" & "The Legend of the Hound" by James Bernard; and "The Death of Sherlock Holmes" by Patrick Gowers.

TMBDOS! Episode 178: “The Seven-Per-Cent Solution” (1976) & “A Scandal in Bohemia” (1984).

September 23rd, 2019

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Lee and Daniel are once again joined by their friend Jack Graham to talk about some more Sherlock Holmes adaptations. First off they get a bit deeper into the character's drug use with "The Seven-Per-Cent Solution" (1976). Then they take a break from the Rathbone series, covered in previous episodes, and take a look at the very first episode of the Jeremy Brett series, "A Scandal in Bohemia" (1984). Racist barons; douchebag kings; train chases; sword fights on top of said trains; terrible BBC Sherlock; and Moriarty slipping the D to Holmes' mom are just a few of the things brought up this time around, as well as listener comments and what Lee has watched recently.

Jack Graham can be found here.

Timeline of the Stupidly genius Zombie Cinema (1932-2000)

"The Seven-Per-Cent Solution" IMDB

"A Scandal in Bohemia" IMDB

Featured Music: "Main Title" & "Sherlock Holmes Passacaglia" by John Addison; "221b Baker Street" by Patrick Growers.

TMBDOS! Episode 177: “The Spider Woman” (1943) & “The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes” (1970).

September 16th, 2019

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Lee and Daniel are joined this week by their friend Jack Graham, making his return to the podcast to help them tackle more Sherlock Holmes adaptations. First up it's another Basil Rathbone film, with 1943's "The Spider Woman". Then they look at one of, if not the first, Holmes film to really take a much different look at the character, with Billy Wilder's "The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes" (1970). Holmes' sexuality; racism and propaganda in the Rathbone films; bald Christopher Lee; and the Loch Ness Monster are just a few of the things talked about in this episode. Listener comments are also covered.

Find Jack Graham's work here.

"The Spider Woman" IMDB 

"The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes" IMDB 

Featured Music: "Moving Out"; "Castles of Scotland; and "Main Titles/221B Baker Street" by Miklos Rozsa.

TMBDOS! Episode 176: “The Hound of the Baskervilles” (1939) & “The Pearl of Death” (1944).

September 8th, 2019

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Lee and Daniel start an extended series looking into film adaptations of Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories. First up, they check out two examples from the 14-film series, starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, that one could argue really captured the imagination of the general movie-going public and cemented Holmes and his stories as a solid well to keep going back to for film adaptation ever since. The two films are "The Hound of the Baskervilles" (1939) & "The Pearl of Death" (1944). There's talk of Holmes being a dickhead; the smashing of fine china; Rondo Hatton; the new Dark Crystal series on Netflix; and listener comments are responded to.

"The Hound of the Baskervilles" IMDB 

"The Pearl of Death" IMDB 

Catch Lee's appearance on the Movie Melt podcast, covering "Psycho Pike". 

Featured Music: "Lieder Ohne Worte" by Felix Mendelssohn & "Caprice for Solo Violin, Op. 1 No. 24" by Niccolò Paganini.

Blood on the Tracks Episode 22: More Poliziotteschi Picks.

March 30th, 2019

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Lee is back with the show's second look into the violent and eccentric world of Poliziotteschi films, and the often diverse scores that come with them.

Playlist:

--Main Theme from "Killer Cop" (1975) --Stelvio Cipriani
--La Fine Di Cobb from "Mark of the Cop" (1975) --Stelvio Cipriani
--Mark Colpisce Ancora (Titoli) from "Mark Strikes Again" (1976) --Stelvio Cipriani
--Sambamba from "The Tough Ones" (1976) --Franco Micalizzi
--Main Titles from "Crime on the Highway" (1982) --Franco Micalizzi
--You Are Not the Same from "Contraband" (1980) --Fabio Frizzi & Cricket
--Dreamland from "Bloody Payroll" (1976) --Enrico Pieranunzi & Silvano Chimenti
--Main Titles from "Confessions of a Police Captain" (1971) --Riz Ortolani
--The Summertime Killer & Motorcycle Circus from "Summertime Killer" (1972) --Luis Bacalov
--Main Theme from "The Police Serve the Citizens?" (1973) --Luis Bacalov
--Life of a Policeman from "High Crime" (1973) --Guido & Maurizio De Angelis
--Il Grande Racket Seq. 1 (Finale) from "The Big Racket" (1976) --Guido & Maurizio De Angelis
--Driving All Around from "Street Law" (1974) --Guido & Maurizio De Angelis

Opening and closing music: Money Orgy from "Danger Diabolik" by Ennio Morricone & Main Theme from "The Horror of Dracula" by James Bernard.

TMBDOS! Episode 157: “The House That Jack Built” (2018).

March 25th, 2019

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Lee and the returning Paul tackle a listener request, and the first ever Lars von Trier film to be reviewed on the show. Both hosts were mostly unfamiliar with his work, but at least knew something about his reputation for transgressive cinema. Was this offensive? Artistic? Interesting? Or was it just overlong and boring? The hosts don't hold back. Listener comments are also covered.

"The House That Jack Built" IMDB 

Featured music: "Happy Jack" by The Who & "Jangling Jack" by Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds.

TMBDOS! Episode 155: “Truck Turner” (1974).

February 25th, 2019

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This week Lee and Daniel hitch a ride with Isaac Hayes as "Truck Turner" (1974), in this highly entertaining blaxploitation film, co-starring Yaphet Kotto, Nichelle Nichols, Scatman Crothers and the recently departed Dick Miller! Coors Beer, KFC two-piece meals, over-the-top pimp fashion sense, and quality squib work are among the topics brought up. Listener comments are also gone through, where we talk about how we can make or break a writer's career. Stick with us - we got beer and we'll buy you a (cheap) chicken dinner.

"Truck Turner" IMDB 

Check out our friend Kit Power's work.

Daniel's other fine podcasts:

Wrong With Authority 
I Don't Speak German 

Featured Music: "Hospital Shootout" & "Main Theme" by Isaac Hayes.

TMBDOS! Episode 154: “The Black Klansman” (1966) & “…Tick…Tick…Tick…” (1970).

February 18th, 2019

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Lee and Daniel tackle two proto-blaxploitation films this week. First off it's well-known shlockster Ted V. Mikels' "The Black Klansman" (1966) and then they look at a far more well-made effort in Ralph Nelson's "...Tick...Tick...Tick..." (1970). They learn about rural racists, more details about the internal politics of the KKK, whiteface doing blackface doing whiteface, double hairpieces, terribly inappropriate theme songs, and the exalted cyclops! Also, going into listener comments, they discover that they are hipster bores. What they've watched as of late is also covered.

"The Black Klansman" IMDB 

"...Tick...Tick...Tick..." IMDB 

The Psychosemantic Podcast 

Featured Music: "The KKK Took My Baby Away" by The Ramones; "Theme from ...Tick...Tick...Tick..." by Tompall & The Glaser Brothers; and "The Black Klansman" by Tony Harris.

TMBDOS! Episode 153: “BlacKkKlansman” (2018).

February 11th, 2019

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Lee and Daniel check out Spike Lee's Oscar-nominated "based on a true story" drama "BlacKkKlansman" (2018). Just how true to life is it really? Does it tackle it's subject matter in an effective manner, or does the lighthearted tone undermine the serious race issues being talked about. Is it no more than just a slickly-made propaganda piece? This and more is pondered by the hosts, who also tackle more listener comments, as well as talking about what they've watched as of late.

"BlacKkKlansman" IMDB 

Daniel's podcast about Alt-Right and Nazi shitheels, "I Don't Speak German" 

Feature Music: "Blut Und Boden (Blood and Soil)" by Terence Blanchard & "Ball of Confusion" by The Temptations.

TMBDOS! Episode 152: “Coffy” (1973) & “Foxy Brown” (1974).

February 4th, 2019

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Lee and Daniel kick off a month looking at Blaxploitation films with two iconic Jack Hill-directed and Pam Grier-starring films: 1973's "Coffy" & 1974's "Foxy Brown". Grier as an actress and cinematic icon is mulled over. Pimps with moose knuckle, dyke bars, rape, racism & Sid Haig are also touched upon. On top of that there's an extended segment of responding to listener comments and a brief mention of what Daniel has been watching that leads into a rant about how shitty Netflix's interface is.

"Coffy" IMDB 

"Foxy Brown" IMDB 

Featured Music: "End of Sugarman" & "Exotic Dance" by Roy Ayers, and "Whatever You Do (Do it Good)" & "Theme of Foxy Brown" by Willie Hutch.