They Must Be Destroyed On Sight!

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TMBDOS! Episode 177: “The Spider Woman” (1943) & “The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes” (1970).

September 16th, 2019

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Lee and Daniel are joined this week by their friend Jack Graham, making his return to the podcast to help them tackle more Sherlock Holmes adaptations. First up it's another Basil Rathbone film, with 1943's "The Spider Woman". Then they look at one of, if not the first, Holmes film to really take a much different look at the character, with Billy Wilder's "The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes" (1970). Holmes' sexuality; racism and propaganda in the Rathbone films; bald Christopher Lee; and the Loch Ness Monster are just a few of the things talked about in this episode. Listener comments are also covered.

Find Jack Graham's work here.

The Spider Woman IMDB 

The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes IMDB 

Featured Music: "Moving Out"; "Castles of Scotland; and "Main Titles/221B Baker Street" by Miklos Rozsa.

TMBDOS! Episode 176: “The Hound of the Baskervilles” (1939) & “The Pearl of Death” (1944).

September 8th, 2019

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Lee and Daniel start an extended series looking into film adaptations of Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories. First up, they check out two examples from the 14-film series, starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, that one could argue really captured the imagination of the general movie-going public and cemented Holmes and his stories as a solid well to keep going back to for film adaptation ever since. The two films are "The Hound of the Baskervilles" (1939) & "The Pearl of Death" (1944). There's talk of Holmes being a dickhead; the smashing of fine china; Rondo Hatton; the new Dark Crystal series on Netflix; and listener comments are responded to.

"The Hound of the Baskervilles" IMDB 

"The Pearl of Death" IMDB 

Catch Lee's appearance on the Movie Melt podcast, covering "Psycho Pike". 

Featured Music: "Lieder Ohne Worte" by Felix Mendelssohn & "Caprice for Solo Violin, Op. 1 No. 24" by Niccolò Paganini.