They Must Be Destroyed On Sight!

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Blood on the Tracks Episode 19: 1980s Sword & Sorcery Films Part 2 (1985-’89).

December 31st, 2018

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Lee's back with part two of his look at the soundtracks and scores of 1980s Sword and Sorcery films, this time finishing off the second half of the 1980s where the genre both peaked and rapidly declined. 1980s pop music influences, sexploitation, overlooked animated gems, and Cannon film flops are all covered in this one.

Playlist:

--Theme from "Barbarian Queen" (1985) -- Chris Young
--Prologue, Hen Wen's Seeing & The Army Of The Dead from "The Black Cauldron" (1985) -- Elmer Bernstein
--Navarre And Marquet Duel & Main Title from "Ladyhawke" (1985) -- Andrew Powell
--Main Title, Temple Raid & End Credits from "Red Sonja" (1985) -- Ennio Morricone
--Darkness & Goblins from "Legend" (1985) -- Tangerine Dream
--Training Montage from "Highlander" (1986) -- Michael Kamen
--Princes of the Universe from "Highlander" (1986) -- Queen
--China's Arrival At Harem from "The Barbarians" (1987) -- Pino Donaggio
--It's Them/Centurion Attack from "Masters of the Universe" (1987) -- Bill Conti
--Willow's Theme from "Willow" -- James Horner (1988)

Opening and closing music: Downhill Decoy from "Danger Diabolik" by Ennio Morricone & Blonk Monster from "House by the Cemetery" by Walter Rizzati.

TMBDOS! Episode 147: “Die Hard” (1988).

December 30th, 2018

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It's the last official episode of 2018 and Lee is joined by the returning Paul, and guest host Greg. This time out they are talking about a little Christmas film called "Die Hard" (1988), directed by John McTiernan. Is it a Christmas film? How does it stack up to the other films in the series? What are the hosts favourite Christmas movies? All of this is covered along with what the hosts have watched lately, a nudity report, and listener comments are also covered.

"Die Hard" IMDB 

Featured Music: "Ode to Joy ('Die Hard' Version)" by Michael Kamen & "Christmas in Hollis" by Run-DMC.  

TMBDOS! Episode 146: “The Transporter” (2002).

December 17th, 2018

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The same crew as last week comes back to talk about another action film. Lee, Daniel, Scott and Greg (again with his nudity report in tow) discuss 2002's "The Transporter" and how it works as both an action film and as a kick-off as a franchise for Jason Statham. The hosts also talk about what they've watched as of late.

The Transporter IMDB

Check out Scott's Guilty Pleasues Cinema at these places:

YouTube
Twitch 

Check out the wrestling podcast Scott and Lee are a part of, Jobber Radio

Triskaidekafiles
Watch "Trashcans of Terror" 

Featured Music: "Interrogation with Inspector" by Stanley Clarke & "Fighting Man" by D.J. Pone & Drixxxe.

TMBDOS! Episode 145: “The Rundown” (2003).

December 9th, 2018

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In this episode Daniel continues to program the movies we review, thus this week we really go out of our wheelhouse and check out a more modern action film, starring Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, "The Rundown" (2003). Greg makes a return from the last episode as a special guest host, and Lee's friend and fellow podcaster, Scott Summerton, makes his first appearance as a guest host on the show. So, of course, he gets to play the Movie God Game! Listener comments are also covered.

The Rundown IMDB

Check out Scott's Guilty Pleasues Cinema at these places:

YouTube
Twitch

Check out the wrestling podcast Scott and Lee are a part of, Jobber Radio

Featured Music: "Don't Take Your Guns to Town" by Johnny Cash & "Get Ur Freak On" by Missy Elliot.

TMBDOS! Episode 144: “Commando” (1985) & “The Running Man” (1987).

December 3rd, 2018

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Lee and Daniel are joined this week by two special guests. Podcaster, and past guest, Gary Hill comes on along with long-time listener and friend of Lee's, Greg Bielawski. In this episode they dig into two films starring Arnold Schwarzenegger from his peak period: "Commando" (1985), and "The Running Man" (1987). Muscles, one-liners, over-the-top action and body counts are pondered by the hosts. Also, Greg gets to play the Movie God Game, and the hosts talk about what they've watched as of late. Feeling dead tired? Why not listen to the show and let off some steam?

"Commando" IMDB

"The Running Man" IMDB

Find Gary Hill on these fine podcasts:

Cinema Beef
Sloppy Seconds
Two Drink Minimum Commentaries

Check out Gary's Fleas & Flicks Charity Auction

Featured Music: "Don't Distrub My Friend" by James Horner, "Commando" by The Ramones & "Intro/Bakersfield" by Harold Faltermeyer.

Blood on the Tracks Episode 18: 1980s Sword & Sorcery Films Part 1 (1980-’84).

December 1st, 2018

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Blood on the Tracks is back after a break to continue the show's journey through the soundtracks and scores of films good or bad. This month Lee kicks off part one of a two-part look at music from 1980s Sword & Sorcery films. In part one he covers selections from films that were released between 1980 to 1984. Get out your loincloth, draw your sword, and start this aural quest with him!

Playlist:

--Hawk the Slayer & Voltan the Dark One from "Hawk the Slayer" (1980) -- Harry Robinson
--Medusa from "Clash of the Titans" (1980) -- Laurence Rosenthal
--Forest Romp/No Sorcerers, No Dragons/Maiden Sacrifice from "Dragonslayer" (1981) -- Alex North
--O Fortuna from "Excalibur" (1981) -- Carl Orff
--Lady of the Lake from "Excalibur" (1981) -- Trevor Jones
--Discovery/Transformation/Den and the Green Ball & Fighting from "Heavy Metal" (1981) -- Elmer Bernstein
--The Beastmaster from "The Beastmaster" (1982) -- Erich Kunzel
--Anvil of Crom, Theology - Civilization & Battle of the Mounds from "Conan the Barbarian" (1982) -- Basil Poledouris
--Castle Chase from "The Sword and the Sorcerer" (1982) -- David Whitaker
--Main Theme from "Conquest" (1983) -- Claudio Simonetti
--The Widow's Web from "Krull" (1983) -- James Horner

Opening and closing music: Downhill Decoy from "Danger Diabolik" by Ennio Morricone & Blonk Monster from "House by the Cemetery" by Walter Rizzati.